In-depth baby product reviews led by a Pediatrician

How We Tested Baby Backpacks

Wednesday May 19, 2021
Finding a comfortable pack was paramount in our testing process.
Finding a comfortable pack was paramount in our testing process.
Credit: Abriah Wofford

We test the baby backpack carriers over several months, taking little testers on actual hiking adventures. Our passengers included multiple children over various iterations of this review, including a 1-year boy who was 29 inches and 20 lbs and a 2-year-old girl who was 32 inches and 28 lbs at the time of testing. Our adult testers were both male and female of different sizes to take into consideration that some packs fit people of various shapes differently. For each metric, we used information both from real-world use and in-house lab comparisons of the products to each other to determine scores and overall rank.

Testing Parent Comfort


Parent Comfort is paramount. If the parent wearing the backpack isn't comfortable, the trips will be short, and they may stop as the baby gets larger. As with any heavy backpack, one of the biggest complaints is shoulder and back strain. We looked at how long we could comfortably carry baby and cargo, considering the padding, adjustments, and on-the-go tweaks to the fit.

Little ones will enjoy the ride more in a cozy cockpit with features...
Little ones will enjoy the ride more in a cozy cockpit with features for comfort.
Credit: Abriah Wofford

Testing Child Comfort


An uncomfortable baby = an unpleasant hike. We really focused on which backpacks offer babies the most deluxe ride, ensuring not only their comfort but enjoyment. Our favorites included well-padded secure cockpits, soft but firm seat pads, angled, and padded face rests, and padded harnesses. The more comfort features the backpack offered, the higher it scored.

The Escape has a stiff waist buckle that is difficult to squeeze...
The Escape has a stiff waist buckle that is difficult to squeeze than it should be and the straps are a struggle to pull unless it is positioned just right on your body.
Credit: Abriah Wofford

Testing Ease-of-Use


How easy a backpack is to adjust and use regularly can also weigh heavily on your decision-making process. We considered how the packs adjusted if they could be adjusted with a baby in the seat, on the fly, and how quickly from one parent to the other should you need to switch carriers. Backpacks with hard-to-reach or complicated buckling systems scored the lowest.

Testing Storage


Storage is a key consideration given the supplies you'll need while out and about. We considered how many storage options the packs had if they were easy to open and access, if they offered internal storage organization and whether or not the wearer could access them. Packs with pockets that were hard to open or lacked sufficient storage for a full day of supplies scored lower. Packs with waistband pockets that would hold smartphones and those with canopy storage options scored higher.