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Hands-on Gear Review

Baby Trend Expedition Double Review

The Baby Trend Expedition Double is a very economical choice that offers nicer rubber pneumatic tires.
Best Value Award
Price:   $200.00 List | $199.99 at Amazon
Pros:  Very budget friendly, nice maneuverability, jogging potential
Cons:  Lower quality materials, noticeable flex and wiggle
Bottom line:  Best on a budget that is easy to push and turn even in small spaces
Editors' Rating:   
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Manufacturer:   Baby Trend

The Skinny

The Baby Trend Expedition is a great option for parents on a budget with a three-wheel design and pneumatic rubber wheels that make it a great mover, easy to turn, and capable of handling almost any terrain. This stroller is the least expensive side-by-side option in this review, but it earned the second highest score for maneuverability and a good score for weight and folded size. This stroller is easy to fold, offers equal recline with added ventilation and under seat storage that accepts larger items. We think parents on a budget will be excited to find a stroller that offers this many features, is easy to push and turn, that also allows for jogging and is smaller and lighter than much of the competition.


RELATED REVIEW: The Best Double Strollers of 2017


Our Analysis and Hands-on Test Results

Review by:
Juliet Spurrier, MD
Mom-in-Chief
BabyGearLab

Last Updated:
Friday
May 5, 2017

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The Baby Trend Expedition Double Jogging Stroller has large pneumatic bicycle tires, locking front swivel wheel, and independent, multiple position reclining seats with a shared canopy. This stroller features 5 point harnesses, storage bin, cup holders, and simple fold. Each seat can accommodate a child up to 50 pounds or 42 inches.



Performance Comparison


The chart below is a comparison of the overall scores for the double strollers tested in this review. The Expedition is shown in blue.


The sections below include information on how the Expedition Double performed during testing for each metric.

Ease of Use


The Expedition earned only 5 of 10 for ease of use, despite having lots of features parents will be looking for. Five other strollers in the review tied with a score of 5.


The high is 8 earned by the UPPAbaby Vista Double. We think ease of use is important because it impacts your daily experience when using the stroller.

We found the red pull up loops to initiate the fold on the Expedition are stiff and take some work to jiggle loose.
The lock on the Expedition is manual  but works well.
 

Fold and Unfold


The Expedition is relatively easy to fold, scoring about average for this test. This stroller requires two hands to fold, has a manual locking mechanism and self-stands when folded. It takes 4 steps to fold the stroller (including releasing the red safety straps), and you will need to bend down about halfway, but it isn't complicated or involved. Unfolding is a little more difficult because the stroller tends to want to fold back up as you unfold it and the size makes it somewhat unwieldy. It only has 2 steps, but it does require both hands and some patience to complete.

The double action brakes on the Expedition can occasionally skip across the gear teeth and feel like they are engaged when they aren't.
The double action brakes on the Expedition can occasionally skip across the gear teeth and feel like they are engaged when they aren't.

Brakes


The Expedition has double action brakes that require the depression of two pedals as opposed to one for single action brakes. While this added step isn't the end of the world, it does leave extra room for error by parents that may forget to press the second pedal, get distracted and fail to press it, or choose not to press it thinking one is good enough and they can save some time. For these reasons, we prefer single action brakes to double. Double are more commonly found on less expensive strollers. The brakes are also difficult to set and very difficult to release when compared to the competition. They are not sandal and barefoot friendly (another disadvantage that might leave parents reluctant to set both sides, and they have 1 inch of play in them once set. They did perform well in our sliding resistance test by not moving far (compared to others) on an incline with the brakes engaged.

The storage bin on the Expedition is good  but would be better if it weren't divided down the middle and there was no strap on the back.
The storage bin on the Expedition is good, but would be better if it weren't divided down the middle and there was no strap on the back.

Storage


The Expedition has under seat storage that would be better if it wasn't divided. It can hold two large diaper bags, but the strap divider on the back prohibits the use of an extra-large diaper bag. The bin only has a maximum weight allowance of 5 pounds, though, so you'll still be limited on what you can put inside based on weight even if the size is right. It does have access from the rear and some from the sides, but the top and front are both closed off for access.

The parent tray on the Baby Trend Expedition  Double is the nicest one in the review with a large covered storage tray and dual cup holders. However  we caution parents about using cup holders while strolling as testing reveals that items can and often do fall from holders on most strollers.
The parent tray on the Baby Trend Expedition Double is the nicest one in the review with a large covered storage tray and dual cup holders. However, we caution parents about using cup holders while strolling as testing reveals that items can and often do fall from holders on most strollers.

Each seat back also has a large mesh pocket and we liked that there is an extra location for storing quick access items. We weren't able to find a weight allowance on the pockets, but the thin mesh will probably be self-limiting and could stretch or rip if you aren't careful about what you put inside. We liked that the pockets have a string to tighten or loosen the opening and is adjustable with a toggle. This is better than those that simply have elastic tops that can stretch out of shape over time. The stroller also has a parent console with 2 cup holders and a covered storage tray; it is arguably the best parent's tray in the review.

The back pockets on the seats are a nice addition for added storage.
The parent tray on the Baby Trend Expedition  Double is the nicest one in the review with a large covered storage tray and dual cup holders. However  we caution parents about using cup holders while strolling as testing reveals that items can and often do fall from holders on most strollers.
 

The passenger seats also have mesh pockets inside for snack and treasure storage. They are fairly wide and can fit some sippy cups. The Expedition has cup holders high and behind baby's head in front of the handlebar. The cup holders are 2.75 inches deep and have a closed design. Taller or heavier items can fall out while stroller, especially over bumps and the items could potentially land on baby given their location.

The peek-a-boo window is a good size  but the mesh is flimsy and the cover attaches with hook and loop closures.
The peek-a-boo window is a good size, but the mesh is flimsy and the cover attaches with hook and loop closures.

Sunshade


The Expedition only has one canopy. The Joovy Scooter X2 has a similar design (though much larger). This canopy is small compared to the competition and it doesn't extend far enough to cover the leg rest on the seat before the drop down to the footpad. It does offer added ventilation and it has one medium sized peek-a-boo window made of mesh with a hook and loop closure on the flap cover. The canopy can be rotated forward for low sun protection or wind block, but baby can't be protected from the elements if a random shower should start.

The plastic components on the Expedition give it a flimsy look and feel.
The canopy on the Expedition is small compared to the competition and we wished it was larger like the Joovy Scooter X2.
 

The photos above show the Expedition with the seats upright and canopies closed and with the canopies fully open and seats reclined.

The buckle on the Expedition is stiff  but the straps pop out on their own. The shoulder straps can be removed to make 3 point harnesses on both seats.
The buckle on the Expedition is stiff, but the straps pop out on their own. The shoulder straps can be removed to make 3 point harnesses on both seats.

Harness


The expedition sports 5-point harnesses in each seat. The harness itself can be difficult to buckle, but unbuckling is even harder because the button is hard to press. The straps do spring away from the buckle, which is nice and speeds up the unbuckling process. Adjusting the straps is only about average as the upper straps tighten with a single pull while the lower straps require significant maneuvering. Shoulder height adjustment is a rethread design with 3 positions and a height range of 4.5 inches. The crotch strap is adjustable in length, which is good since it only has one position. This can help make the entire harness a little more adaptable and suitable for children of varying heights.

The recline feature on the Expedition is easy enough to operate  but it does require two hands to operate.
The recline feature on the Expedition is easy enough to operate, but it does require two hands to operate.

Seat


The Expedition does not have an adjustable leg rest, but the padding on the leg rest feels nicer than we remember on their single Expedition. Both seats have the same style of recline adjustment and it requires two hands and is more involved than the competition. The upside is the recline has infinite positions as opposed to set angles, which will allow each little one to have the recline angle they need to be cozy.

Ease of Setup





Setup for the Expedition is about average for the group with a setup time of 9 minutes and 20 seconds. The documentation is also about average, with a multi-language format that is hard to work with because they are all in the same section instead of separated into individual sections. The assembly requires a crescent wrench and a Phillips head screwdriver. A lot of the competition does not require tools for assembly.

The pneumatic rubber tires helped the Expedition earn a high score for maneuverability.
The pneumatic rubber tires helped the Expedition earn a high score for maneuverability.

Maneuverability


Maneuverability is where this budget friendly stroller shines. With a score of 8 of 10 this stroller managed to perform better than the majority of the competition. This is impressive given the large difference in price between the Expedition and the rest of the group.


The best in the group are far more expensive and only score 1 point higher with 9s. These include the Thule Urban Glide 2, Thule Chariot Cross 2and the BOB Revolution Flex Duallie that all have rubber pneumatic tires.

The front swivel wheel on the Expedition can be locked in place for jogging or easier pushing over uneven terrain.
The front swivel wheel on the Expedition can be locked in place for jogging or easier pushing over uneven terrain.

For pushing on flat surfaces the Expedition did a great job. Unfortunately, it is on the wide side. The rear wheels tend to get stuck on narrow spaces because they stick out past the frame. In testing, we had difficult with the wheels getting caught on floorboards, and we weren't able to get it through a 34-inch doorway with a 32-inch opening.

Pushing off the beaten path is just as easy, and the Expedition performed well over grass and gravel. The larger wheels make it easy for this jogger to make it over the uneven surfaces. It is similar to the BOB Revolution Flex Duallie, just not as nice. This stroller also fared well over curbs.

The Expedition is surprisingly light and small for a three wheeled jogging stroller.
The Expedition is surprisingly light and small for a three wheeled jogging stroller.

Weight and Folded Size


The Expedition weighs 30.6 pounds, making it the lightest jogger in the review and one of the lighter doubles overall. The Baby Trend Navigator is the heaviest stroller at 39.7 pounds. Only 3 strollers in the review are lighter than the Expedition.


The Expedition is 18,401 cubic inches when folded. This is on the larger side, but still below the average of the group at 18,900, and it could be reduced slightly by removing the front wheel. The Britax B-Agile Double is the smallest when folded at 10,649 cubic inches. This stroller earned a 6 of 10 for the metric, tying with the Joovy Scooter X2.

The Baby Trend Expedition is a 3 wheel jogging style side-by-side stroller.
The Baby Trend Expedition is a 3 wheel jogging style side-by-side stroller.

Quality


The Baby Trend brand is usually the least expensive or close to the least in almost every gear category. This is the same for strollers where you tend to get what you pay for. The Expedition earned a 4 of 10 for quality. The high for the review is 9 for the Thule Urban Glide 2 and the Thule Chariot Cross 2, which both cost significantly more than the Expedition.


The fabric is only so-so compared to the competition, but the padding under the fabric is decent. The piping on the leg portion is raised and feels like it would chafe bare legs on longer rides. The canopies are made with a heavier more durable feeling fabric, with softer canvas on the seating areas. The Peek-a-boo window is a loosely woven mesh which is harder to snag than it looks like, but the storage bin is flimsy with the same mesh on either side. Peekaboo window is loosely woven mesh, doesn't snag hardly at all. The basket is made of the same flimsy material with strips of mesh down each side.

The frame on the Expedition has a solid frame but it looks flimsy and cheap compared to the rest of the group. It has a lot of plastic components and there is flex in the frame. The overall fit and finish is one that looks a little on the flimsy side. The tires are pneumatic rubber and the wheels are spoked. The wheels are described as bicycle wheels, which sounds impressive but we had trouble with the wheels and the rubber staying on the frame. All the wheels had trouble at one point or another with the rubber falling off. The tubes are fine and they didn't go flat, but it was a hassle and really annoying. We suspect the average parent won't know how to fix this problem and might end up at a bike shop paying money to fix it by a professional.

The handlebar on the Expedition is stationary at 40.6 inches up from the ground. It is a smaller diameter which is never a good thing for something you may need to hold for a longer duration and it decreases maneuverability. It is covered in rubber, which we don't like as much as foam covered options. There is once again a divide in the handlebar with a plastic portion that sits on the ground when it folds and stands. This means it will hard or impossible to push with one hand.

This stroller has no suspension which is a shame for a jogging/all-terrain stroller, and we think short-sighted in the long run. However, for the price, we can almost forgive this given that the tires are rubber and the sling style seats should make the ride somewhat more comfortable.

Ease of Car Seat Attachment


The Expedition does not work with any infant car seats from any brand. This means children will need to be independently sitting with full head and neck control before using this stroller.

This stroller could be used for older twins or children of different ages. These little models are 2.5 years old  30 lbs. and 37.5" inches tall  and 5 years old  40 lbs. and 44" inches tall.
This stroller could be used for older twins or children of different ages. These little models are 2.5 years old, 30 lbs. and 37.5" inches tall, and 5 years old, 40 lbs. and 44" inches tall.

Twins


The Expedition doesn't accept any infant car seats, which makes it a poor choice for infant twins. For parents looking for an instant option for newborns, this stroller will not fit the bill as children need to be at least 6 months in order to ride. However, because it has equal seating for both passengers it could be a good solution for price-conscious parents of older twins and children of multiple ages. If saving money is the plan most families can still save money by choosing this option for older children and the Joovy Twin Roo+ for infant children still in infant car seats. Both strollers together can bring a total of close to $300, still a very budget-friendly combination and below most double options that take two infant car seats.

The Expedition is great for budget conscious parents that like to leave the beaten path.
The Expedition is great for budget conscious parents that like to leave the beaten path.

Best Applications


The Baby Trend Expedition Double is a good purchase for parents looking for a side-by-side stroller that is versatile and has a friendly price. This stroller has nice rubber tires that allow you to jog and roll over rougher terrain. It maneuvers well and offers the same riding experience for both passengers, which helps prevent arguments between little ones on who sits where.

Value


The Expedition is listed at $200 list price with sales often running closer to $170. This stroller scored well for maneuverability, making strolling for the pusher a nicer experience than most of the lower price models in the review. This alone makes this option a good value. Because parents can use it over various terrains and for jogging, it also means they don't need to purchase an additional product for various activities. We also think the similar riding experience for passengers is a great feature that makes the Expedition a good value, as many of the of strollers that have lower price tags also have inline styling that provides a very different rider experience for both passengers, including different recline angles, lack of legroom, and different canopy sizes.

These little Expedition passengers include a 2.5 year old  that is 30 lbs.  37.5" tall and a 5 year old that is 40 lbs. and 44" tall.
These little Expedition passengers include a 2.5 year old, that is 30 lbs., 37.5" tall and a 5 year old that is 40 lbs. and 44" tall.

Conclusion


The Baby Trend Expedition is a side-by-side double jogging stroller. It features pneumatic rubber tires, easy fold, lighter weight, and under seat storage. This stroller has the best parent tray in the review and additional storage pockets on the back of the seats with toggle adjustments. The under seat storage is nice and accommodates an extra-large diaper bag. It has vented recline, passengers stow pockets and a mesh peek-a-boo window. While it didn't score as high as a lot of the competition, it did earn a great score for maneuverability and weight and folded size, making it a great buy for parents with limited money for gear. We think that most parents will appreciate the lower price tag and features, even if they wish the quality were a little nicer or the features easier to use. It is not a good choice for infant twins, but it will work for babies over 6 months old and for children of various ages. We recommend this stroller for what it has to offer, reminding parents that the lower price comes with compromise, but in general, it has what you need with a very friendly price tag.

Other Versions and Accessories


Baby Trend also makes the Baby Trend Sit N' Stand, and the Baby Trend Navigator. We tested the Sit N' Stand and it scored last in our review of 19 products. We also reviewed the Navigator, and while it accepts two infant car seats (Baby Trend brand seats only) it didn't perform well in most tests and scored relatively low overall. Also, its 4 wheel design is odd and uncommon for jogging strollers. We worry this could potentially increase the risk of accidents while running. If one front wheel catches on something or gets locked up on something in your path, it could cause the stroller to become unbalanced or tippy. This stroller is the heaviest one in the review at over 39 lbs and it is bulky when folded.

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Juliet Spurrier, MD & BabyGearLab Team

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Most recent review: May 5, 2017
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