In-depth reviews guided by a Pediatrician

Kiddy Adventure Pack Review

Features look better on paper than they function in real life
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Price:   $209 List | Check Price at Amazon
Pros:  Attached canopy, cheaper price, 2 drool pads
Cons:  Hard to adjust on the fly, difficult to use, poor storage
Manufacturer:   Kiddy
By Juliet Spurrier, MD & Wendy Schmitz  ⋅  Nov 20, 2017
  • Share this article:
39
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#7 of 9
  • Parent Comfort - 30% 5
  • Storage - 20% 2
  • Child Comfort - 25% 4
  • Ease of Use - 25% 4

The Skinny

The Kiddy Adventure Pack has several features parents may be looking for, but their execution is disappointing and frustrating. This pack has limited storage and adjustability for both parents and children. While it has a lower price than much of the competition, the quality and performance reflect this, and we feel most parents won't want to wear the pack for extended adventures. With difficult on the fly changes and a poorly designed seat pad that doesn't support baby's weight, we think parents are better off considering the Kelty Journey PerfectFit that scored higher and has a cheaper price.


Compare to Similar Products

Our Analysis and Test Results

The Kiddy Adventure Pack is an okay pack with features that don't function as well as they could. This pack is made by the same manufacturer as the Clevr Cross Country and the two packs share similar design flaws.
The Kiddy Adventure Pack is an okay pack with features that don't function as well as they could. This pack is made by the same manufacturer as the Clevr Cross Country and the two packs share similar design flaws.

For 50 years, Kiddy has worked to increase car safety for children. The company has filed patents concerning lie-flat technology, impact shield, and shock absorbers and has received awards from Stiftung Warentest and ADAC for safety and quality. Their Evoluna i-Size is the only infant car seat with a lie-flat function inside and outside the car. Kiddy products are sold in over 50 countries worldwide and include car seats, strollers, and backpack carriers.

Performance Comparison


The comparison chart below shows the overall scores for the backpacks we tested in this review including the Kiddy (blue).


The subsections below include details on how the Kiddy performed compared to the competition.

Comfort for the adult is below average for the Kiddy with a limited torso adjustment range and hard to move shoulder straps.
Comfort for the adult is below average for the Kiddy with a limited torso adjustment range and hard to move shoulder straps.

Parent Comfort


The Kiddy earned a 5 of 10 for parent comfort.

Adjusting the Kiddy shoulder strap height involves unthreading the strap from the buckle and threading through different height straps on the back of the pad before putting the buckle back on. This cannot be done while wearing the pack.
The Kiddy chest clip and buckle are stiff and difficult to squeeze.

This pack has padded shoulders (above left) that are sort of ho-hum and uninspired, but they do the job without discomfort. The chest clip is stiff (above right), but it sits off your chest.

The Kiddy torso adjustment is more hassle than it is worth given the 1.5-inch height range difference.
The Kiddy torso adjustment is more hassle than it is worth given the 1.5-inch height range difference.

The back of the pack has so-so padding. The pad is breathable and opens to expose the torso height strap but the torso range is only 1.5 inches making it somewhat useless.

The Kiddy waistband is adequately padded  but it lacks the comfort and smooth movement of the better packs.
The Kiddy waistband is adequately padded, but it lacks the comfort and smooth movement of the better packs.

The waist belt has average padding but it isn't as supportive as it should be. A significant amount of baby's weight rests on your hips making a supportive belt essential.

The Kiddy has a removable lumbar support pad attached with Velcro. Unfortunately  it is thin and testers couldn't say it improved comfort or fit since they couldn't even feel if it was in place.
The Kiddy has a removable lumbar support pad attached with Velcro. Unfortunately, it is thin and testers couldn't say it improved comfort or fit since they couldn't even feel if it was in place.

The back pad has a removable lumbar support that attaches with Velcro. Our testers didn't know if it was there or not indicating it doesn't offer much support. It could be a useful addition, but it needs to be more substantial to be effective.

The Kiddy has a poorly designed seat pad and strangely convoluted harness adjustment with a seat pad that folds under the weight of the baby providing poor support.
The Kiddy has a poorly designed seat pad and strangely convoluted harness adjustment with a seat pad that folds under the weight of the baby providing poor support.

Child Comfort


The Kiddy earned a 4 of 10 for child comfort.

The seat pad on the Kiddy is adjustable for height but it is difficult to move up or down and you can't raise it with baby in the pack very well.
The seat pad on the Kiddy is adjustable for height but it is difficult to move up or down and you can't raise it with baby in the pack very well.

The seat bottom has average padding but it folds in half under baby's weight. The seat padding runs from the back up the front covering the straps and buckles for comfort and the fabric is not soft and could chafe baby's exposed skin. The shoulder straps are lightly padded and sufficient for baby's comfort.

The drool/face pad of the Kiddy is nicely placed  but the vertical angle isn't comfortable for napping and the fabric isn't as soft as it could be.
The Kiddy drool pad is removable for easier cleaning and it comes with an extra pad to use while you clean the first.

This pack has a front face rest (above left) with two removable drool pad (above right). This pad is useful for napping little ones and the drool cloth is easier to keep clean than those that don't remove.

The cockpit of the Kiddy is tighter than the cheaper models  but it lacks stirrups which could be uncomfortable for some taller children.
The cockpit of the Kiddy is tighter than the cheaper models, but it lacks stirrups which could be uncomfortable for some taller children.

The cockpit on the Kiddy isn't as tight as we'd like but it isn't so open that baby will be flopping around like the Phil and Teds Parade. The pack doesn't offer stirrups, so little one's legs will dangle.

The Kiddy canopy is attached to the pack and fits in a pocket on the top of the storage area.
Once you pop the Kiddy canopy out of the pocket the front clips into place to keep it open.

The Kiddy has a built-in canopy that pops up from the rear storage pocket (above left) and the front clips in (above right) to secure the hood. It feels like a cheaper version of the Deuter Kid Comfort 3 which is one of the best and it is challenging to stuff back into the pocket.

The Kiddy is challenging to use with several convoluted features that are better on paper than in real life.
The Kiddy is challenging to use with several convoluted features that are better on paper than in real life.

Ease of Use


The Kiddy earned a 4 of 10 for ease of use. This score is the low score for the carriers.

The harness shoulder straps on the Kiddy are padded  but the padding makes it hard to change the height.
The push button chest clip on the Kiddy should be easier to use than it is but the button is stiff.

The child harness (above left) is hard to adjust and near impossible with a baby in the pack. The strap has to be taken out of buckle, looped through the back of the carrier and then threaded through buckle again. The chest clip has a button push (above right) and is weirdly stiff for such a simple design. Adjusting the baby's seat is also challenging with raising harder than lowering but and moving to the higher position is almost impossible with a baby in the carrier.

The adult shoulder straps are stiff and don't move smoothly making tightening on the fly frustrating and the buckles on the chest and waist are stubborn and difficult to push. The torso adjustment is time-consuming and convoluted, and given the limited range of movement, it's almost not worth the hassle.

The Kiddy has dual carry straps that don't get in the way of general functionality.
The Kiddy has dual carry straps that don't get in the way of general functionality.

The Kiddy has dual carry handles attached mostly out of the way. There is no location for a hydration bladder but it has a water bottle holder. The manual is similar to that of the Clevr Cross Country using the same pictures with the same model number indicating the two packs are made by the same manufacturer.

The leg brace of the Kiddy pops out for a fairly stable pack. It has lock straps that need to be opened before you put the pack on because you can't do it after the fact.
The leg brace of the Kiddy pops out for a fairly stable pack. It has lock straps that need to be opened before you put the pack on because you can't do it after the fact.

The leg brace locks in place and will stand if you don't lock it but for safety, you should double check the lock before letting go of the carrier with your baby inside. There are safety straps you need to unlock before closing the brace which can't be done once the pack is on.

With the exception of the waistband pocket  none of the storage on the Kiddy is accessible by the wearer of the pack which means you may need to hold some items in your hands.
With the exception of the waistband pocket, none of the storage on the Kiddy is accessible by the wearer of the pack which means you may need to hold some items in your hands.

Storage


The Kiddy earned a 2 of 10 for storage, making it the worst in the group.

The main storage pocket is big enough for diaper  wipes  and snacks  but the zipper is sticky and gets caught on the cover flap making it frustrating to use.
The top pocket on the Kiddy has an exposed zipper that doesn't get stuck  but the pocket only holds a pound and the opening is so much smaller than the pocket its tough to really utilize the whole thing.

The main pocket (above left) is large, but access is frustrating. There is a flap covering the zipper causing it to get stuck in the fabric. There is a smaller zippered pocket (above right) higher up on the backpack which is easier to operate thanks to an uncovered zipper.

The padded waistband has a zippered pocket with a fabric cover. The cover makes it hard to open and it doesn't fit even smaller mobile phones.
The padded waistband has a zippered pocket with a fabric cover. The cover makes it hard to open and it doesn't fit even smaller mobile phones.

There is a mesh water bottle holder with an elastic band at the top to help keep the bottle in place. The holder is unreachable by the wearer, and it requires two hands to get a bottle inside. The waistband pocket has a zipper but is too small for most mobile phones, and the zipper is sticky with a similar fabric cover problem as the main pocket.

The canopy of the Kiddy stores in the top pocket of the pack. It isn't a great fit and it's frustrating getting back in the pack.
The canopy of the Kiddy stores in the top pocket of the pack. It isn't a great fit and it's frustrating getting back in the pack.

The canopy is attached to the pack so it can't get lost or misplaced. It stores in a dedicated pocket at the top of the bag and while difficult to get in and out, this is preferable to those products where the canopy doesn't have storage or isn't connectedk.

Manufacturer Video




Juliet Spurrier, MD & Wendy Schmitz